Proceedings: GI 2004

Toolglasses, marking menus, and hotkeys: a comparison of one and two-handed command selection techniques

Daniel Odell , Richard Davis , Andrew Smith , Paul Wright

Proceedings of Graphics Interface 2004: London, Ontario, Canada, 17 - 19 May 2004, 17-24

DOI 10.20380/GI2004.03

  • Bibtex

    @inproceedings{Odell:2004:10.20380/GI2004.03,
    author = {Odell, Daniel and Davis, Richard and Smith, Andrew and Wright, Paul},
    title = {Toolglasses, marking menus, and hotkeys: a comparison of one and two-handed command selection techniques},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of Graphics Interface 2004},
    series = {GI 2004},
    year = {2004},
    issn = {0-89791-213-6},
    isbn = {1-56881-227-2},
    location = {London, Ontario, Canada},
    pages = {17--24},
    numpages = {8},
    doi = {10.20380/GI2004.03},
    publisher = {Canadian Human-Computer Communications Society},
    address = {School of Computer Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada},
    keywords = {Input},
    }

Abstract

This paper introduces a new input technique, bimanual marking menus, and compares its performance with five other techniques: static toolbars, hotkeys, grouped hotkeys, marking menus, and toolglasses. The study builds on previous work by setting the comparison in a commonly encountered task, shape drawing. In this context, grouped hotkeys and bimanual marking menus were found to be the fastest. Subjectively, the most preferred input method was bimanual marking menus. Toolglass performance was unexpectedly slow, which hints at the importance of low-level toolglass implementation choices.