Awards

Alain Fournier Award

Best Doctoral Dissertation in Computer Graphics

The Award

The “Alain Fournier Memorial Fund” was created to celebrate Alain’s life, to commemorate his accomplishments, and to honour his memory. It rewards an exceptional computer graphics Ph.D. dissertation defended in a Canadian University over the previous year. The winning dissertation is selected through a juried process by a selection committee consisting of accomplished researchers in computer graphics. The award is administered by the Vancouver Foundation. It is presented at the Graphics Interface conference.

Recipients

Hua Li
2013

Nominations & Selection

Eligible candidates must:

  • Have defended his/her Ph.D. dissertation in a Canadian University in the area of Computer Graphics, between January 1st and December 31st of the previous year.
  • Be nominated by a faculty member at a Canadian university.
  • Send the following documents by email to Dr. Pierre Poulin by February 15th:
    • Letter of nomination by a faculty member at a Canadian university
    • Short resume, including a list of publications
    • Electronic version (PDF) of the Ph.D. dissertation

The selection committee will evaluate each candidate according to the quality of the innovations, the dissertation, the curriculum, etc. Note: a faculty member at a Canadian university can nominate more than one candidate. Questions about eligibility and the award can be sent to Dr. Pierre Poulin. If you have any suggestions, please contact Pierre Poulin at poulin@iro.umontreal.ca

About Alain Fournier

On August 14th, 2000, Dr. Alain Fournier passed away. He was a leading international figure in computer graphics, and a strong and frequent contributor to the Graphics Interface conference. His insights, enthusiasm, wisdom, vast knowledge, humour, and genuine friendship touched everyone he met. The “Alain Fournier Memorial Fund” was created to celebrate his life, to commemorate his accomplishments, and to honour his memory. It rewards an exceptional computer graphics Ph.D. thesis defended in a Canadian University over the past year. The winning thesis is selected through a juried process by a selection committee consisting of accomplished researchers in computer graphics. Fournier made contributions to computer graphics dealing with modelling of natural phenomena. He advocated a methodology that required validation against real visual phenomena. He once called his approach impressionistic graphics and it both revolutionized the field and drove it forward. An example is his beautiful paper (with Bill Reeves) on the depiction of ocean waves. His subsequent work dealt with illumination models, light transport, rendering, and sampling and filtering.