Bill Buxton

2011 Canadian Digital Media Pioneer Award Recipient

William (Bill) Buxton is a Canadian digital media pioneer in the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). As a prolific researcher, designer, inventor and teacher, Bill has devoted over three decades to improving the human factors of technology and advocating for the importance of design in digital media products and systems.

Perhaps best known for his work in pioneering multi-touch systems and novel user interface designs for computer music systems, Bill’s early research paved the way for the track-pads and touch-screens that are ubiquitous today. Now a Principal Researcher at Microsoft, he has earned international recognition over the years for his often radical approaches to design and innovation that take into account human values, and the individual, social and cultural experiences that products provoke. Named one of the top five designers in Canada by Time Magazine, Bill was one of the first dozen recipients of ACM SIGCHI’s most prestigious honour, a Lifetime Achievement Award for contributions to the field of HCI.

Bill was introduced to HCI in the early 1970s while an undergraduate studying music at Queen’s University. Encouraged by one of his instructors, he became part of a project that was developing a digital music system at the National Research Council of Canada in Ottawa. There he discovered the groundbreaking work of early computer animator Peter Foldes, which piqued his fascination with the power of computers. As a professional musician, Bill was drawn to the role of electronics and computers in musical composition and performance. He became an “artist-in-residence” at the University of Toronto’s Department of Computer Science where he designed his own digital musical instruments. Upon completing his MSc in 1975, he joined the faculty, where he remains an Adjunct Professor.

Photo courtesy of the National Research Council
Photo courtesy of the National Research Council.

Bill began an active and prolific career in experimental research exploring new user interface design techniques and led the Input Research Group (IRG) at U of T. He is a frequent contributor to the CHI, UIST, SIGGRAPH, Multimedia, and other conferences, as well as to books and journals. His 1985 paper on the capacitive multi-touch tablet was the first ever in the peer-reviewed literature to discuss a multi-touch device. He holds over 20 patents on these and other techniques.

In the late 1980s and early 90s, Bill was a research consultant for Xerox PARC and EuroPARC, where he worked with Mark Weiser developing the nascent concepts of ubiquitous computing, and also for Apple. He later became Chief Scientist for Toronto-based Alias|wavefront (now part of Autodesk), where he collaborated with prominent film makers and designers, and helped develop a robust painting program that is still used by artists and designers today.

Bill’s numerous publications attest to his diverse interests: from music and the arts, to articles on exploration, history and mountaineering, to the subtleties of the equestrian arts. His 2007 book, Sketching User Experiences, is a major work in the theory and practice of holistic design.

Bill is widely known as a gifted and articulate speaker. His lectures have inspired countless students and colleagues. As an impassioned spokesperson for HCI and design, Bill has helped raise the awareness and importance of the field.

Through his leadership and provocative ideas, Bill Buxton has helped shape modern design to better reflect human values and experience. His vision and inventions have transformed the way we interact with computers. In acknowledgement of his numerous contributions to the field of Human-Computer Interaction, Bill Buxton has been recognized as a Canadian Digital Media Pioneer.

Biography

Born in 1949, William “Bill” Buxton is a musician and composer. He completed a BSc in music from Queen’s University, then studied and taught music for two years at the Institute of Sonology in Utrecht, Netherlands, before returning to Canada. Bill earned an MSc in computer science at the University of Toronto, and then joined the faculty as an Adjunct Professor. From 1987-89, Bill was in Cambridge, England, helping establish a new satellite of Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center (EuroPARC). From 1989-94 he split his time between Toronto, where he was Scientific Director of the Ontario Telepresence Project, and Palo Alto, California, where he was a consulting researcher at Xerox PARC. From 1994 until December 2002, he was Chief Scientist of Alias|wavefront, (now part of Autodesk) and from 1995, its parent company SGI Inc. From 1998-2004, Bill was on the board of the Canadian Film Centre, and in 1998-99 chaired a panel to advise the Premier of Ontario on developing long-term policy to foster innovation, through the Ontario Jobs and Investment Board. In the fall of 2004, he became a part-time instructor in the Department of Industrial Design at the Ontario College of Art and Design. In 2004/05 he was also Visiting Professor at the Knowledge Media Design Institute (KMDI) at the University of Toronto. He later became Principal of his own Toronto-based boutique design and consulting firm, Bill Design. In 2005, he was appointed Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research.

Bill is the recipient of four honorary doctorates, and a co-recipient of an Academy Award for Scientific and Technical Achievement. In 2008, Bill also became the tenth recipient of the distinguished ACM SIGCHI Lifetime Achievement Award, “for fundamental contributions to the field of Computer Human Interaction,” and in January 2009, he was elected Fellow of the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM), for his contributions to the field. Bill is presently an Adjunct Professor at the University of Toronto and Distinguished Professor of Industrial Design at the Technical University Eindhoven. He also writes a regular column in BusinessWeek.

Selected Works

MacKenzie, I.S., Sellen, A. & Buxton, W. (1991). A comparison of input devices in elemental pointing and dragging tasks, Proceedings of CHI ’91, ACM Conference on Human Factors in Software, 161-166. Link

Lee, S., Buxton, W. & Smith, K.C. (1985). A Multi-Touch Three Dimensional Touch-Sensitive Tablet. Proceedings of the 1985 Conference on Human Factors in Computer Systems, CHI ’85, San Francisco, April, 1985, 21-26. PDF

Buxton, W. (1997). Living in Augmented Reality: Ubiquitous Media and Reactive Environments. In K. Finn, A. Sellen & S. Wilber (Eds.). Video Mediated Communication. Hillsdale, N.J.: Erlbaum, 363-384. An earlier version of this chapter also appears in Proceedings of Imagina ’95. Link

Buxton, W. (1986). Chunking and Phrasing and the Design of Human-Computer Dialogues, Proceedings of the IFIP World Computer Congress, Dublin, Ireland, 475-480. PDF

Photo courtesy of the National Research Council

Bill Buxton

Lauréat du prix Pionnier des médias numériques au Canada 2011

William (Bill) Buxton est un pionnier canadien des médias numériques dans le domaine de l’interaction homme-machine (IHM). Chercheur, designer, inventeur et enseignant prolifiques, M. Buxton a consacré plus de trois décennies à l’amélioration des aspects humains de la technologie et à la promotion de l’importance du design dans les produits et systèmes des médias numériques.

Surtout connu pour ses travaux d’avant-garde relatifs aux systèmes tactiles multipoints et à la conception d’interfaces-utilisateurs novatrices pour les systèmes d’informatique musicale, M. Buxton a tracé la voie, dans ses premiers travaux de recherche, aux pavés tactiles et aux écrans tactiles dont on remarque l’omniprésence de nos jours. Dorénavant chercheur principal chez Microsoft, il s’est taillé une réputation internationale au fil des ans pour ses démarches souvent radicales en matière de design et d’innovation qui tiennent compte des valeurs humaines et des expériences individuelles, sociales et culturelles suscitées par les produits. Classé parmi les cinq meilleurs designers du Canada par le Time Magazine, M. Buxton faisait partie des douze premiers lauréats du plus prestigieux hommage décerné par le groupe d’intérêts spéciaux SIGCHI de l’Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), le Prix d’excellence pour l’ensemble des réalisations en reconnaissance de ses contributions au domaine de l’IHM.

M. Buxton a découvert l’IHM au début des années 1970 alors qu’il était étudiant de premier cycle en musique à l’Université Queen’s. Fort des encouragements d’un de ses instructeurs, il a pris part à un projet œuvrant au développement d’un système de musique numérique au Conseil national de recherches du Canada à Ottawa. C’est là qu’il a découvert les travaux révolutionnaires de Peter Foldes, un animateur par ordinateur des premiers temps, qui a éveillé sa fascination envers la puissance des ordinateurs. En tant que musicien professionnel, M. Buxton s’intéressait particulièrement au rôle de l’électronique et des ordinateurs dans la composition et l’interprétation musicales. Il a été nommé « artiste résident » au département d’informatique de l’Université de Toronto où il a mis au point ses propres instruments de musique numérique. Après voir obtenu sa maîtrise ès sciences en 1975, il a rejoint le corps professoral de l’université où il demeure professeur auxiliaire.

M. Buxton a commencé une carrière active et prolifique en recherche expérimentale portant sur l’exploration de nouvelles techniques de conception d’interfaces-utilisateurs et a dirigé l’Input Research Group (IRG) de l’U. de Toronto. Il a fréquemment apporté sa contribution aux conférences CHI, UIST, SIGGRAPH, Multimedia et à bien d’autres ainsi qu’à de nombreux ouvrages et revues. Son article de 1985 sur la tablette tactile capacitive fut le tout premier paru dans la littérature évaluée par les pairs qui abordait un appareil tactile multipoints. Il détient plus de 20 brevets sur ces techniques et bien d’autres encore.

Vers la fin des années 1980 et le début des années 90, M. Buxton a été conseiller en recherche aux Xerox PARC et EuroPARC, où il a collaboré avec Mark Weiser au développement des concepts émergents de l’informatique omniprésente et a travaillé pour le compte d’Apple. Plus tard, il est devenu expert scientifique en chef chez Alias|wavefront (une entreprise de Toronto qui fait dorénavant partie d’Autodesk), où il a collaboré avec des cinéastes et des designers de premier plan et a participé à la mise au point d’un robuste programme de peinture d’image encore utilisé de nos jours par les artistes et les designers.

Les nombreuses publications de M. Buxton témoignent de la diversité de ses intérêts : de la musique aux arts, d’articles sur l’exploration, l’histoire et l’alpinisme aux subtilités des arts et sports équestres. Son livre de 2007 Sketching User Experiences est un ouvrage majeur de la théorie et de la pratique du design « holistique ».

M. Buxton est un orateur de grand talent. Les cours qu’il a donnés ont inspiré d’innombrables étudiants et collègues. Porte-parole passionné de l’IHM et du design, M. Buxton a aidé à sensibiliser les gens à l’importance de ce domaine.

Grâce à son leadership et à ses idées chocs, Bill Buxton a participé au façonnement du design moderne afin qu’il reflète au mieux l’expérience et les valeurs humaines. Sa vision et ses inventions ont transformé nos interactions avec les ordinateurs. C’est en reconnaissance de ses maintes contributions au domaine de l’interaction homme-machine que Bill Buxton est nommé Pionnier canadien des médias numériques.

Biographie

Né en 1949, William « Bill » Buxton est musicien et compositeur. Il a obtenu un baccalauréat ès sciences en musique de l’Université Queen’s, avant d’étudier et d’enseigner la musique pendant deux ans à l’Institut de Sonologie d’Utrecht, aux Pays-Bas. De retour au Canada, M. Buxton s’est mérité une maîtrise ès sciences en informatique de l’Université de Toronto qu’il a ensuite rejointe à titre de professeur auxiliaire. Durant les années 1987-89, M. Buxton était à Cambridge, Angleterre, où il participait à l’établissement d’EuroPARC, un nouveau satellite du Palo Alto Research Center de Xerox. De 1989 à 1994, il partageait son temps entre Toronto, où il était directeur scientifique de l’Ontario Telepresence Project, et Palo Alto, Californie, où il était conseiller de recherche au PARC de Xerox. De 1994 à décembre 2002, il était scientifique en chef chez Alias|wavefront, (qui fait désormais partie d’Autodesk) et à partir de 1995, chez sa société mère SGI Inc. Durant la période 1998-2004, M. Buxton siégeait au conseil d’administration du Canadian Film Centre, et en 1998-1999, il a présidé un groupe de spécialistes conseillant le premier ministre de l’Ontario sur le développement d’une politique à long terme concernant la promotion de l’innovation et ce, par le biais du Conseil de l’emploi et de l’investissement de l’Ontario. À l’automne 2004, il a occupé un poste d’instructeur à temps partiel dans le département de design industriel de l’École d’art et de design de l’Ontario. En 2004-2005, il fut également professeur invité au Knowledge Media Design Institute (KMDI) de l’Université de Toronto. Il est par la suite devenu premier responsable de Bill Design, sa propre société de conseil et d’expertise en design basée à Toronto. En 2005, il a été nommé chercheur principal à Microsoft Research.

M. Buxton s’est vu remettre trois doctorats honorifiques et est corécipiendaire d’un oscar « Academy Award for Scientific and Technical Achievement ». En 2008, M. Buxton est devenu le dixième  récipiendaire du prestigieux Prix d’excellence pour l’ensemble des réalisations du SIGCHI de l’Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) « en reconnaissance de ses contributions fondamentales au domaine de l’interaction homme-machine » puis en janvier 2009, il a été élu Fellow de l’ACM en reconnaissance de ses contributions au domaine. M. Buxton est actuellement professeur auxiliaire à l’Université de Toronto et professeur distingué de design industriel à l’Université Technique d’Eindhoven. Il tient également une rubrique régulière dans BusinessWeek.

Travaux choisis

MacKenzie, I.S., Sellen, A. & Buxton, W. (1991). A comparison of input devices in elemental pointing and dragging tasks, Proceedings of CHI ’91, ACM Conference on Human Factors in Software, 161-166. Link

Lee, S., Buxton, W. & Smith, K.C. (1985). A Multi-Touch Three Dimensional Touch-Sensitive Tablet. Proceedings of the 1985 Conference on Human Factors in Computer Systems, CHI ’85, San Francisco, April, 1985, 21-26. PDF

Buxton, W. (1997). Living in Augmented Reality: Ubiquitous Media and Reactive Environments. In K. Finn, A. Sellen & S. Wilber (Eds.). Video Mediated Communication. Hillsdale, N.J.: Erlbaum, 363-384. An earlier version of this chapter also appears in Proceedings of Imagina ’95. Link

Buxton, W. (1986). Chunking and Phrasing and the Design of Human-Computer Dialogues, Proceedings of the IFIP World Computer Congress, Dublin, Ireland, 475-480. PDF

Photo: Conseil national de recherches du Canada