Proceedings: GI 2007

Animation in a peripheral display: distraction, appeal, and information conveyance in varying display configurations

Christopher Plaue , John Stasko

Proceedings of Graphics Interface 2007: Montréal, Québec, Canada, 28 - 30 May 2007, 135-142

DOI 10.20380/GI2007.19

  • Bibtex

    @inproceedings{Plaue:2007:10.20380/GI2007.19,
    author = {Plaue, Christopher and Stasko, John},
    title = {Animation in a peripheral display: distraction, appeal, and information conveyance in varying display configurations},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of Graphics Interface 2007},
    series = {GI 2007},
    year = {2007},
    issn = {0713-5424},
    isbn = {978-1-56881-337-0},
    location = {Montr{\'e}al, Qu{\'e}bec, Canada},
    pages = {135--142},
    numpages = {8},
    doi = {10.20380/GI2007.19},
    acmdoi = {doi>10.1145/1268517.1268541},
    publisher = {Canadian Human-Computer Communications Society},
    address = {University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada},
    }

Abstract

Peripheral displays provide secondary awareness of news and information to people. When such displays are static, the amount of information that can be presented is limited and the display may become boring or routine over time. Adding animation to peripheral displays can allow them to show more information and can potentially enhance visual interest and appeal, but it may also make the display very distracting. Is it possible to employ animation for visual benefit without increasing distraction? We have created a peripheral display system called BlueGoo that visualizes R.S.S. news feeds as animated photographic collages. We present an empirical study in which participants did not find the system to be distracting, and many found it to be appealing. The study also explored how different display sizes and positions affect information conveyance and distraction. Animations on an angled second monitor appeared to be more distracting than three other configurations.