Proceedings: GI + CHI 1987

A case example of human factors in product definition: needs finding for a voice output workstation for the blind

Richard Kane, Matthew Yuschik

Proceedings of the SIGCHI/GI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems and Graphics Interface: Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 5 - 9 April 1987, 69-73

DOI 10.1145/29933.30862

  • BibTex

    @inproceedings{Kane:1987:10.1145/29933.30862,
    author = {Kane, Richard and Yuschik, Matthew},
    title = {A case example of human factors in product definition: needs finding for a voice output workstation for the blind},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of the SIGCHI/GI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems and Graphics Interface},
    series = {GI + CHI 1987},
    year = {1987},
    issn = {0713-5425},
    isbn = {0-89791-213-6},
    location = {Toronto, Ontario, Canada},
    pages = {69--73},
    numpages = {5},
    doi = {10.1145/29933.30862},
    acmdoi = {10.1145/29933.30862},
    publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
    address = {New York, NY, USA},
    }

Abstract

Human factors efforts can contribute to product design at every design phase from conception through evaluation of a product in the field. Early human factors involvement has certain advantages. The major advantage is that it can have greater “leverage” by influencing more far-reaching aspects of a product. Input at later design phases, on the other hand, may delay product schedules or require a major re-design effort. Input at earlier stages can diminish these problems. As a case example, a needs finding study for a voice output workstation for the blind is described. Users of these workstations participated in a semi-structured interview to determine their needs. Results identified specific features needed. The findings also indicated that the original scope of the project, word processing, should be broadened to include other applications.