Proceedings: GI + CHI 1987

Positioning human factors in the user interface development chain

Jonathan Grudin, Susan Ehrlich, Rick Shriner

Proceedings of the SIGCHI/GI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems and Graphics Interface: Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 5 - 9 April 1987, 125-131

DOI 10.1145/29933.30871

  • BibTex

    @inproceedings{Grudin:1987:10.1145/29933.30871,
    author = {Grudin, Jonathan and Ehrlich, Susan and Shriner, Rick},
    title = {Positioning human factors in the user interface development chain},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of the SIGCHI/GI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems and Graphics Interface},
    series = {GI + CHI 1987},
    year = {1987},
    issn = {0713-5425},
    isbn = {0-89791-213-6},
    location = {Toronto, Ontario, Canada},
    pages = {125--131},
    numpages = {7},
    doi = {10.1145/29933.30871},
    acmdoi = {10.1145/29933.30871},
    publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
    address = {New York, NY, USA},
    }

Abstract

Human factors professionals are not completely free to support the optimization of user interface design within the time span of individual software development projects. Interface design is constrained by conservative forces, such as the expectations of users of existing systems in the installed base and emerging de facto or formal standards. At the same time, human factors involvement with a particular product may ultimately have its greatest impact on future product releases. In this paper we explore an expanded time line for influencing product design. This time line brings middle- and upper-management concerns into focus, revealing critical opportunities for effectively positioning and applying human factors resources.