Proceedings: GI + CHI 1987

Voice: technology searching for communication needs

Arlene Aucella, Robin Kinkead, Anna Wichansky, Chris Shmandt

Proceedings of the SIGCHI/GI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems and Graphics Interface: Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 5 - 9 April 1987, 41-44

DOI 10.1145/29933.30858

  • BibTex

    @inproceedings{Aucella:1987:10.1145/29933.30858,
    author = {Aucella, Arlene and Kinkead, Robin and Wichansky, Anna and Shmandt, Chris},
    title = {Voice: technology searching for communication needs},
    booktitle = {Proceedings of the SIGCHI/GI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems and Graphics Interface},
    series = {GI + CHI 1987},
    year = {1987},
    issn = {0713-5425},
    isbn = {0-89791-213-6},
    location = {Toronto, Ontario, Canada},
    pages = {41--44},
    numpages = {4},
    doi = {10.1145/29933.30858},
    acmdoi = {10.1145/29933.30858},
    publisher = {Association for Computing Machinery},
    address = {New York, NY, USA},
    }

Abstract

Voice technology is just beginning to gain a foothold in the information processing world. Applications such as voice mail, credit verification, order entry and airline reservation systems are slowly being introduced. Critics of voice systems frequently point out their limitations with little understanding of their power or advantages. One key determinant of the success or failure of voice systems is the USER INTERFACE. It is important that the dialogue structure, prompts, system feedback and error messages be designed based on user input, testing and evaluation.Another key determinant of the success of voice systems is the careful matching of users, tasks and environment to the technology. Voice technology is often broken down into 3 major categories.Speech compression. Processing allows analog patterns of human speech to be digitized. Once stored in digital form, the information can be transmitted and played back.Common Applications: Voice Mail, Voice Annotation.Text-to-Speech. Processing allows computer-stored text to be translated and retrieved via a “synthesized” voice. Common applications: Remote retrieval of information (E-Mail, Calendar Appointments), Aids to Visually or Vocally Handicapped.Speech Recognition. Processing allows analog patterns of human speech to be translated into their text-based equivalent or into computer commands.Common Applications: Data Entry, Voice Activated Typewriter.